Designing the Steamhaus Office

From the very beginning we wanted to be different when it came to our branding. We wanted the whole package to feel right.

When it came to the office, we were really particular. As with anything Daniel and I do, we wanted to make it as cool and as user friendly as possible – but most importantly, ensure it’s an inspiring place for our staff to work.

Our last company’s office made the headlines, achieving critical acclaim for its design and execution, but we wanted to show that we’ve grown up over the last three years. Steamhaus has given us the chance to go one up on last time while maintaining that fun and friendly atmosphere synonymous with Daniel’s reputation.

The office had to have the right balance: a combination of finding the perfect space for a fairly hefty start-up, located in an area that reflected the type of people we are and the customers we wanted to attract, and last but not least, somewhere that would tie in with our steampunk/industrious art deco theme. The latter was developed from us being able to reject the usual hi-tech themes of our competitors and the traditional bricks and mortar data centres of old. So we went full-on analogue, something that we all find really exciting!

Like everything at Steamhaus, the name of the game is bespoke. We are cloud architects, designing elegant solutions around customers’ individual needs. We needed a proper home to reflect the way we feel about the business – and not just an office. I think it’s particularly important to get aesthetics right in order to create a positive environment where people want to work and spread the right messages. This definitely isn’t new news anymore – what we helped to pioneer back in 2011 has caught on. Office buildings around Manchester and further afield have got rid of their strip lighting, taken down the suspended ceilings and re-exposed the beauty of the Victorian mill and factory buildings that fill the city centre.

You can imagine our delight when we discovered that the parquet panels bought from an interior salvage company and made into bespoke desks with beautiful Eames-style hairpin legs once lined the lab floors of UMIST. We love the romantic thought that the likes of Alan Turing and Ernest Rutherford will have at one time regularly walked on the very parquet of the desks that we work at every day. We think they’ve ended up in the right home. Don’t you?

Pip Rustage Steam Haus Manchester   Pip Rustage Steam Haus Manchester

Pip Rustage Steam Haus Manchester   Pip Rustage Steam Haus Manchester

Pip Rustage Steam Haus Manchester   Pip Rustage Steam Haus Manchester

Pip Rustage Steam Haus Manchester   Pip Rustage Steam Haus Manchester

Pip Rustage Steam Haus Manchester   Steam Haus Manchester

 

 

 

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